1. tomewing:

    notquiteaspopular:

    Cher - “Believe” (#806, 1998, 7 weeks). Under discussion here: http://freakytrigger.co.uk/popular/2014/07/cher-believe/

    I wrote this VERY fast to get it in before I go on holiday tomorrow, but I think it’s pretty good. I think the song’s pretty good too.

  2. All of the brands on Sex and the City.

  3. doublematthew:

    My Novel Writing Diary - Volume 19  - Sunday, July 20, 2014

    Rejection; your voice vs your need to be understood; giving good support; dating as a metaphor for creative reception; finding the audience that will love you; writing that jumps off the page.

    Words Written: 35,343 total (approximately 1,497 these past two weeks).

    Novel: Summertime by JM Coetzee

  4. ‘Never Say Never’ by Basement Jaxx feat ETML is my new jam.

    ‘Never Say Never’ by Basement Jaxx feat ETML is my new jam.

  5. lambtime:

    ( perfume genius - queen )

    directed by SSION

  6. ‘Flatline’ by Mutya Keisha SiobhanThe beauty of this song is that at each moment of the vocals, you can hear and recognize the individual voices of Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan. This one is now sad, this one is hopeful, this one is getting over it this very instant. It’s refreshing; we are so used to hearing harmonies multi-tracked from a single voice, or having a pop group’s chorus cannon-blasted at us, that there is a tingly, unexpected thrill at having three very different women share a song with charm, generosity and understated emotion.

    ‘Flatline’ by Mutya Keisha Siobhan
    The beauty of this song is that at each moment of the vocals, you can hear and recognize the individual voices of Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan. This one is now sad, this one is hopeful, this one is getting over it this very instant. It’s refreshing; we are so used to hearing harmonies multi-tracked from a single voice, or having a pop group’s chorus cannon-blasted at us, that there is a tingly, unexpected thrill at having three very different women share a song with charm, generosity and understated emotion.

  7. ‘The Sound of Violence’ by CassiusWhy I am not always listening to this song? “I feel like I want to be you more than I.” Filthy/gorgeous.

    ‘The Sound of Violence’ by Cassius
    Why I am not always listening to this song? “I feel like I want to be you more than I.” Filthy/gorgeous.

  8. doublematthew:

    My Novel Writing Diary - Volume 18 - Sunday, July 6, 2014

    Pride; French-Canadian sentence structures; necessary arrogance; competition in art; waiting and waiting for feedback; wanting to run away from literary communities.

    Words Written: 33,846 total (approximately 1,727 this week).

    Novel: Summertime, by JM Coetzee

  9. ‘Break Free feat. Zedd’ by Ariana GrandeEverything I liked about Ariana Grande is missing from her new song. And yet, I keep playing it.

    ‘Break Free feat. Zedd’ by Ariana Grande
    Everything I liked about Ariana Grande is missing from her new song. And yet, I keep playing it.

  10. sadybusiness:

    I caught up on that “Adults Should Feel Embarrassed to Read YA” controversy a while ago. First, I thought people’s reactions were funny. Then, I thought they were deeply sad. Then, when I did the stupid thing, and opened my mouth about it, I thought they were pretty maddening. 

    I mean, the word “snobby” or “snooty” was in every response piece I read. Every. Single. One. The idea that adults should read books written at their own grade level, or that it was sort of strange for adults to participate in activities meant for children and teenagers, was just not to be borne. 

    But the responses really got to me. Someone, well-meaning, Tweeted me that David Foster Wallace was elitist, because you had to work to keep up with him linguistically. Someone else, not as well-meaning, Tweeted that there were never any articles written that attacked current literary fiction. (And that Harry Potter was written at a higher linguistic skill level than “White Teeth.” I mean, I bet it does have more unique words, because it has fucking magic spells in it.) Someone asked why they couldn’t just read things that were “fun.” A man with “Prof” in his Twitter handle, whose other Tweets included lines like “a scathing satire of French history,” wrote in to condemn “smartarse crap” for “elite audiences.” 

    Yeah. Because scathing satires of French history are so notoriously accessible and in-demand. 

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