1. lambtime:

    well that leaked early.  

    ( caribou - all i ever need )

  2. laissez-moidanser:

    Still my fave.

    PXO!

  3. doublematthew:

    My Novel Writing Diary - Volume 20 - Sunday, July 27, 2014

    I talk about the two spaces of writing: composing and free-thinking; grinding my way through some dead writing; JM Coetzee, goth; Elaine Stritch and the problem of mortality; What are we really waiting for?

    Words Written: 36,343 total (approximately 981 this week).

    Novel: Summertime by JM Coetzee

  4. ‘Tough Love’ by Jessie WareGorgeousness.

    ‘Tough Love’ by Jessie Ware
    Gorgeousness.

  5. tomewing:

    notquiteaspopular:

    Cher - “Believe” (#806, 1998, 7 weeks). Under discussion here: http://freakytrigger.co.uk/popular/2014/07/cher-believe/

    I wrote this VERY fast to get it in before I go on holiday tomorrow, but I think it’s pretty good. I think the song’s pretty good too.

  6. All of the brands on Sex and the City.

  7. doublematthew:

    My Novel Writing Diary - Volume 19  - Sunday, July 20, 2014

    Rejection; your voice vs your need to be understood; giving good support; dating as a metaphor for creative reception; finding the audience that will love you; writing that jumps off the page.

    Words Written: 35,343 total (approximately 1,497 these past two weeks).

    Novel: Summertime by JM Coetzee

  8. ‘Never Say Never’ by Basement Jaxx feat ETML is my new jam.

    ‘Never Say Never’ by Basement Jaxx feat ETML is my new jam.

  9. lambtime:

    ( perfume genius - queen )

    directed by SSION

  10. ‘Flatline’ by Mutya Keisha SiobhanThe beauty of this song is that at each moment of the vocals, you can hear and recognize the individual voices of Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan. This one is now sad, this one is hopeful, this one is getting over it this very instant. It’s refreshing; we are so used to hearing harmonies multi-tracked from a single voice, or having a pop group’s chorus cannon-blasted at us, that there is a tingly, unexpected thrill at having three very different women share a song with charm, generosity and understated emotion.

    ‘Flatline’ by Mutya Keisha Siobhan
    The beauty of this song is that at each moment of the vocals, you can hear and recognize the individual voices of Mutya, Keisha and Siobhan. This one is now sad, this one is hopeful, this one is getting over it this very instant. It’s refreshing; we are so used to hearing harmonies multi-tracked from a single voice, or having a pop group’s chorus cannon-blasted at us, that there is a tingly, unexpected thrill at having three very different women share a song with charm, generosity and understated emotion.